John Nelson

want to set up bedroom mixing area

6 posts in this topic

Hello, i am a audio engineer recording student that would love to start a bedroom mixing/listening room.. i know about having acoustic treatments and all of that.. my question is would this set up work if i had all the right treatment and ect.  I dont see too many examples of this method.. but none the less would this still work as a functioning mixing room?  the picture is attached

post-23983-0-91114300-1408417648_thumb.png

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G,day Ozman,

 

Great pic! :)

 

Aside from the practicality of needing to climb under/over your desk to get to your seat, the primary reason you won't see this type of layout is to do with room acoustics. Low frequencies (bass) tends to collect and reverberate (boom) at the room perimeters, such as the walls, and more so in the corners.

 

So such a set-up would have you sitting smack back in the middle of an area overloaded with bass, up to around 9dBA louder than other areas. Certainly gives your speakers plenty of bang for their buck, at the expense of clarity and balance across the low end frequencies.

 

In saying that, having your speakers away from the walls actually helps to not couple with the room itself, so effectively calming their bass output.

 

So it's really just the seat in the room corner that's the primary concern.

 

What's the purpose for the rest of the room?

 

The #1 ideal spot will be directly facing into the right hand wall, with the desk, say half a metre out from the wall, so the speakers aren't pushed up against the wall itself. And watch out they're not pushed into the room corners either.

 

The 2nd preference would be along one of the longer walls, whether the bottom of top walls in the picture.

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thank you for your reply.. there would be enough room to get in :) the main reason is so i could see out the window across the room and see people coming in and out and i have always liked forts and tight little spaces kinda like my own drivers seat if you will. Do you think with proper bass traps and acoustical treatment this could work?

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I saw .. something some time ago, it was a  Lynda tutorial for you room speakers/ studio monitors  placement, is forgot about it, i can give you a link with some tips,  but i think is not for free, here is a video "trailer" where you can see the speakers position, and some "stuff" that can help you (this one is free ) :

 http://www.lynda.com/Audio-Studio-Setup-tutorials/Music-Studio-Setup-Acoustics/124073-2.html

 If you do a deep search , you can find some free tutorials.

 Also the ideea is not to be just in the middle of the speakers, you need to be more to left or right (sorry for my bad english), because if you are just  in the middle you can have some amplitude from some frequencies. And will be a fake +3db boost.

 I draw something, so you can understand it better. It's one of my best drawing :D

post-23951-0-94745000-1408743148_thumb.jpg

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re: "the idea is not to be just in the middle of the speakers, you need to be more to left or right"

Interesting concept, and yes, there is an approximate 3dB boost when listening to the pair of speakers from dead centre (where the sounds that are common to both speakers - ie. mono - combine together) however is that fake, or simply just reality? 

 

However, what happens if sitting slightly to the left, or to the right of dead centre? Is one then hearing the natural balance of sounds across the sound-stage?

If sitting slightly to the left, would one be tempted to turn DOWN sounds in the left channel and turn UP sounds in the right channel to compensate from the non-central listening position?

 

Personally, I'd go with sitting dead centre so I know my left/right positioned sounds are able to set predictably.

 

Also the whole panning of a single sound left, right, and centre is an interesting one. Many mixers employ a -3dB dip dead centre so the sounds don't appear to come across stronger when set to the middle of the soundstage (ie. when both left and right speakers are playing exactly the same sound to combine and appear louder than if it were panned just left, or just right).

More info on this here:
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/nov05/articles/qa1106_6.htm
 

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My ideea was when you are listening 1 mic, you can have a "fake" boost from some frequencies (that +3db), but you are right also, when are doing a mix and you want to pan some mics, can be some problems if you are more to left or right.

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