Brycicle

Speaker loudness Help!

7 posts in this topic

Hi everyone, im pretty new here and not even sure if this is the right forum to be asking this question but i need some help.

i am in a band and we needed something for our singer to sing out of, so we went to the local music shop and asked around and they said that the LEGACY dlx 15a would be fine for what we need. so we bought it. got home, plugged it all in and it was super quiet.. so we played music through it and it was pretty loud. im just not sure whats going on?

any help will be appreciated,

thanks

the mic is a sennheiser e840 if thats any help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Brycicle,

I'm assuming your trying to plug the mic straight into the speaker? Sounds like the mic is going into an input with the wrong impedance, usually a 'line' input if your music playback is coming out at the right levels.

Line devices like CD players, ipods, mixers etc use connections with a much higher impedance than mics. Without getting technical about it, bottom line is if the impedance of the device doesn't match the input connection, the levels are all wrong. Hence speakers designed to plug mics directly into will have an input dedicated to this.

Unfortunately looking at the specs: http://www.legacymusic.com.au/products/index.cfm?action=view&id=252 your speaker only supports line input.

If you can't swap the speaker for one that does, then you can either use a small mixer to connect between the mic and the speaker (which also gives your singer volume control), or get a mic-line impedance matcher which is just a plug that sits between the mic lead and the speaker input. First option better, second option cheaper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't argue with anything RB has posted. You need a mixer or a level convert/mic pre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't even know there were impedance converters to allow a mic to plug into a line level input. At least not a passive adaptor? Or is it an active thing? Yeah yeah could Goodle... ;)

Anyway, I too would much prefer a small compact mixer for the task, like a baby Mackie VLZ series or Allen & Heath ZED series (the latter preferable if you wanted to upgrade to a reverb-equipped FX model to spice up the vocals), though I can appreciate the price climbs with the features.

"...we went to the local music shop and asked around and they said that the LEGACY dlx 15a would be fine for what we need" would be grounds for a refund due to being 'wrongly described' and 'doesn't do as it was intended'. If you're not the least happy with the speaker, I'd seriously consider a return and get something that works.

Not sure what you paid, but if close to the AUD$699 retail listed on the manufacture's site, then I suspect something like a QSC K10 would be be dramatic improvement (expecting it to be louder/clearer) for a just a couple of hundred more (under AUD$900) and it also features a mic / line switch so no problem with dynamic mics, such as the e840 (N.B. just no phantom power for condenser mics).

The K-Series active speakers also present a 2 source input mixer, allowing you to mix a vocal through one channel, and a keyboard synth or iPod even through another input, each with it's own input volume control, negating the need for a separate audio mixer, albeit the controls being restricted at the back of the speaker.

A compact mixer is more useful (eg. I have a Mackie 802VLZ3, which over the weekend saw duties in a couple of shows mixing my electronic percussion sounds together with the pianist's keyboard output, and a spare channel ready for the presenter's microphone) and is really the only the way to go for adjusting the individual instrument levels on the fly.

The pair of QSC K10s I was also using worked well, its wide dispersion (90 degrees) perfect, with one box projecting foldback/sidefill across the choir and orchestra, the other box distributing its sound from the corner of the stage across a reasonable wide audience in the venue. Not sure a 75 degree or narrower horn dispersion characteristic would have allowed for such a balanced natural projection across the same set of spaces, particularly when limited to just one box for each task.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorry for the super late reply,

so would we need to just get a small mixer to boost the volume? or are we better off to get some other speakers and a small mixer?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Start with just a small mixer and see how you go before investing even more money in new speakers too. If the levels are AOK then you're good to go!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, gotta consider a small mixer... but what's the best micro mixer in its class? Well given your need for vocals, then a reverb (not too much) effect is kinda a must too, as is a little compression to tame the vocal dynamics to better sit into the mix.

So what's best micro mixer with compression and effects?

Well, I reckon it'd have to be the Yamaha MG82CX.

mg82cx_medium_jpg.jpg

http://www.turramusic.com.au/Pages/CatalogueItem.aspx?CIID=2179

A bit of a rip @ AUD$250 when they're a $100 less than that from the USA (just watch out for AU plug type, does the transformer switch 240v/50Hz, and of course warranty), but nothing else for this price offers effects, compression (albeit super basic), from a leading audio company.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now