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Jaxs84

Cans?

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Hey punks. Hoping you may be able to give us some advice regarding what Headphones you are using for production. Am looking to get a new pair but am undecided what to look for. Any info is great

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Hi Jaxs84, welcome! :D

funny_pictures_Rocking_Boobs.jpg

How will they be used?

- Hearing the finer details of a mix?

- Sound design?

- Monitoring for a vocalist / musician during recording?

- Live venues?

Some of the greatest headphones around are 'open back' design, perfect for critically listening to a mix in a quiet studio, however, not so good when working with microphones. In this instance, a 'closed back' design would minimise spill/leaks from the headphones from being captured with the recording.

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True, except a lot of vocalists have trouble controlling pitch if you use fully enclosed headphones. The bleed into the mic is easily compensated by using a little control on your gains. Fixing vocal pitch... Not so trivial.

I would recommend you check out beyerdynamic dt770 and dt990 pros. The 770 are a fully enclosed version of the 990 and suit live mixing better. Neither are dj headphones.

Best idea is to listen to a few sets back to back. The beyers are over $300 a set, but generally cheaper than the s brand and much better sounding.

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True, except a lot of vocalists have trouble controlling pitch if you use fully enclosed headphones. The bleed into the mic is easily compensated by using a little control on your gains. Fixing vocal pitch... Not so trivial.

A psycho-physical reality in fact. Opera singers are good ones to talk to about a thing known as bone-conducted sound versus air-conducted sound. When you think about it, the vibrations caused by singing cause your jaw and skull to vibrate as well as the air in the oral cavity. Just put your hands on your head or face while you hum and you get it ;) Opera singers learn to exploit both conductors as it has direct impact on their pitch and timbre. They literally sing with their entire head.

Fully enclosed headphones affect the balance between bone-conducted and air-conducted sound travelling from the mouth, diffracting around the head and back to the ears. The main ingredient missing is ambient reflections from the room reinforcing the direct sound from the mouth, especially high frequencies which spray outwards more, and around the head less, than low frequencies* . When the singer only hears direct sound, an increased amount of bone-conducted sound, and less high-frequency ambience**, low frequencies are more prominent and the singer instinctively goes flat.

* Basic theory of diffraction - low frequency waves bend around corners better than high frequency waves.

** This is why it's helpful to add reverb to the headphone sends for a lot of singers - it psychologically adds back the ambience they instinctively want.

I would recommend you check out beyerdynamic dt770 and dt990 pros. The 770 are a fully enclosed version of the 990 and suit live mixing better. Neither are dj headphones.

Best idea is to listen to a few sets back to back. The beyers are over $300 a set, but generally cheaper than the s brand and much better sounding.

I agree beautiful recording headphones. Transparent sound, good sensitivity and really comfortable to wear  :D

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:- Hadn't really thought about the mechanisms before - i knew from experience that the better 'trained' a singer, the less impact wearing cans has on them. The more arrogant/drug fucked and less trained the singer, the more likely you are to need to ditch cans all together and just use monitors.

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^ Indeed the better trained singers are aware of the effect. Good professional singers can pitch themselves up or down incrementally to adjust, or have a very good awareness of what the pitch should sound like from their internal musical memory.

Nic from the Lychees is quite something to watch in the studio - she knows within seconds if she pitched something incorrectly and asks to do another take immediately. She can also flip between breathy, nasal, full-throat, and full-diaphragm sounds like a switch.

But it took years of experience in the studio to get like that. And ask most singers, studio technique and stage/gig technique are completely different.

Anyway, thread hijacked kinda, should be another topic :D

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I would recommend you check out beyerdynamic dt770 and dt990 pros. The 770 are a fully enclosed version of the 990 and suit live mixing better. Neither are dj headphones.

I think for my needs/preferences, I'd be going the DT770 'closed backs' (ie. don't want to share my sounds with those around me, plus better suited in live environments).

Now they come in 80 Ohm and 250 Ohm versions, right? (ie. The higher the number, the more power required to drive them, the less loud they appear given the same number on the volume knob.)

What do you recommend? I'm trying to find out what would be best for use with my desk (VLZ1604PRO), but the manual doesn't state much other than 'all other outputs = 120 Ohms' (which may or may not include the headphone out). Certainly no specific recommendation.

And who's the best retailer for headphones these days?

I know Chemical Records UK gets teh DJs moist with their Senh... Sen.... S.. purchases.

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I bought my DT990's from an Aussie retailer. At the time, only $100 cheaper to get them imported & i got a whole bunch of free Beyer branded goodies :D

My 990's are 250Ohm. I don't think you'll have an issue with either version... but the 990's aren't short on volume even when plugged into an MP3 playery thingo.

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Dear jax,

If you a looking for great headphones I recommend the Sennheiser HD25, but they are expensive. They have a great frequency response and handle high levels if you are doing any live sound.

To add to what rhythm boy said I have notice that after using 10 years of both the AKG 240 & 141 against the Fostex T40 that most singers sing better with the Fostex T40. I have had numerous occasions with different vocalist on different sessions that with the T40’s they could hear themselves or pitch better. I am continuing my study into this and hopefully have some sort of conclusion soon.  My initial conclusion so far is that the T40 sit a lot lighter on you head and do not push on the ear so much as the AKG’s.  Which would relate to the Basic theory of diffraction.

But getting back to point my top 3 headphones. Purely as they have lasted over time

Sennheiser HD25

AKG 141 or 240

Fostex T40

And my main advice is try them out like speakers, get three that you think you want and listen to a wide variety of your favourite music and A B them to one another.

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^ Yep also love the T40's, got a pair myself, have mixed several tracks for release with them.

My impression of the T40's

- slightly heavier on the head than DT770/990 - but the leather earpads are nice

- slightly quieter than most headphones

- really even bottom end - not boosted like a lot of consumer headphones are. Takes a bit of getting used to, I have to trust that the lack of 'oomph' is ok and translates fine to speakers. In fact, adding oomph in the T40's definitely adds mud to the mix.

- really even spectrum all over - like I said I have finished mixes with them quite successfully  :D

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