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Distortion

42 posts in this topic

Admitted, GR does take up a bit of CPU - but considering the trade-off is that it actually sounds good - it's pretty much worth it. ;)

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Yeah, Amplitube is good. I haven't bought Devastor, although I am a d16 fanboi, because it's based on the distortion unit on Phoscyon, which is not to my taste (the distortion, not Phoscyon. Phoscyon is awesome)

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im searching for the best distortion to go in my mb808

tube

overdrive

bit redux

fuzz

what are your thoughts on the best type ?

im going to make a whole bunch before i chuck one in the 808

but keen to see if anyone has any keen favourites

as ill try those first

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i have just been playing with devastator, some awesome range there, also use the camel audio plugs and old TC works native bundle

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luke already knows i recommend any but the bit redux - but think an analog bit redux would make a great external effect for synths. digital ones are naturally so harsh...

i say go the tube.

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analog bit redux would make a great external effect for synths. digital ones are naturally so harsh...

Is there such a thing? Bit reduction would be digital by definition, I thought.

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indeed yes it is

and technically it's not a distortion effect, although it introduces distortion.    i like'em precisely because they sound digital & unlike any analog effect.

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The one's I've seen (and posted above) are more sample rate reducers than bit depth reducers.

using a sample-and-hold circuit which samples the input at the sampling frequency.

So by the definition of digital it is sampling the audio at discreet frequencies - does this make it digital?

Maybe because it's being controlled by voltages they call it analogue?

I don't understand it either....

more info

http://timara.con.oberlin.edu/~jtalbert/S&H/S&H.pdf

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im going to breadboard a whole bunch soon

transistor & tube over drive and fuz

diode rectified

and some others

ill post some results

perhaps when im done ii can make some little stomp boxes for people if they like the sound of some

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The one's I've seen (and posted above) are more sample rate reducers than bit depth reducers.

using a sample-and-hold circuit which samples the input at the sampling frequency.

So by the definition of digital it is sampling the audio at discreet frequencies - does this make it digital?

Maybe because it's being controlled by voltages they call it analogue?

I don't understand it either....

more info

http://timara.con.oberlin.edu/~jtalbert/S&H/S&H.pdf

lol wut?  :)

a sample is just a snapshot of something right, and we do it at a rate of x times per second. that something could be a 16-bit word (ie. 1001101001010011) or an analog signal (+0.6v etc)

Sample & Hold and Sample Rate Reduction "effects" are two different things.

Sample & Hold takes a continuously variable signal and 'samples' it into discrete steps. Yes it is "sampling" in the sense of seeing where a signal is momentarily at and then outputting that level as a fixed amount, until the next sample occurs. the incoming signal could be audio or control voltage, and the outgoing signal could also be audio or control voltage. i think a lot of the time it ends up as control yes? given the number of synths that include an S&H purely for control reasons.

Sample Rate Reduction effects play off of the nature of the digital audio encoding system that we use, and is about reducing the information contained in a digital audio stream, sometimes for technical reasons but nowadays probably more often for effect.  & no you can't do bit reduction till you gots bits to reduce.

so ahh.. i think what it boils down to is that they are both different exploits of the same technique - and as such can approach similar sounds when operating at similar frequencies. S&H tends to use much lower sample rates and variable rates, where as bit depth reduction is often fixed, and even at low levels is running at a higher frequency that the average sample and hold effect (think how delay, chorus, reverb and flange are all created from the same principles)

here's a good resource on s&h, geared towards the nord modular but applicable to anything else modular or otherwise http://www.clavia.se/nordmodular/Modularzone/SampleHold.html

but yeah bit reduction is digital only.

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think jed is referring to bugbrand's bug crush box

bugcrush08_2_thumb.jpg

tom's words

"The BugCrusher - Audio rate Sample & Hold for Bit Crush effects

Refer to the AD781 Datasheet

I'd wanted to make some sort of bit-crusher effect for ages, but never quite figured the way to use microprocessors or ADC/DACs. And then I came across the Analog Devices AD781 Sample & Hold Amp and it struck me that running this at audio rates would effectively give a simple means of changing the sampling rate - not true bit-crushing but it sounds great!

The AD781 is very easy to implement. All you need is a 5v trigger pulse at whatever rate - this must, however, be of very narrow pulses, so I used a 40106 chip (with 5v supply) to make a narrow pulse osc. You also need to keep the pulses narrow to avoid signal bleed through. From this point I added a Voltage Controlled Resistor onto the circuit to make the Trigger Osc voltage controllable. These circuits were designed for my modular system - they run off a +/- 12v bipolar supply"

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was referring to these

"Is there such a thing? Bit reduction would be digital by definition, I thought."

"So by the definition of digital it is sampling the audio at discreet frequencies - does this make it digital?

Maybe because it's being controlled by voltages they call it analogue?"

indeedly not a digital bit crusher but an analog sample&hold at audio frequencies :) looks nice

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Sweet

Thanks for translating my jedlish into english Spaz:)

I guess it shouldn't really be called it a bit-crusher but I think the name kinda stuck due to the similar sound (and sounded like bug-crusher  8))

Definately want to make one of these though.

Soooo....

All ADC's use some form of sample-and-hold - taking a sample of the voltage each pulse and digitising it.

Only in this case it's not being quantized by the bit-depth and turned into 16 or 24 1's and 0's,

it is going straight to the output until the next pulse comes and the next sample is taken.

- hence no bit crush.

some more samples of it here - the waveform gets very crunchy and square and you get lots of those lovely nasty harmonics and also a form of modulation by the pulse square wave frequency

http://electro-music.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=80419#80419

Ooh and for another idea how about an FM transmitter and receiver in a box you could tune in and out and add some static and radio fuzz....

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