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Chords in a Scale

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This is doing my head in a bit. Don't know much music theory.

If I'm writing in a certain key, say Fminor, then does it stand to reason that I could play any chord whose notes lie within the F minor scale? Obviously there's a lot more to it than that, but am I on the right track?

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Long answer: yes, with traditionally a hierarchy of chords from 'strongest' to 'weakest'.

Can I use F major? Less flats to deal with :D

In order from strongest to weakest:

chord I (F): F-A-C

chord V ©: C-E-G

chord IV (B flat): Bb-D-F

chord II (Gm): G-Bb-D

chord VI (Dm): D-F-A

chord VII (Em): E-G-B or (Eb): Eb-G-Bb

chord III (Am): A-C-E

For whatever Key, the chord number (I-VII) hierarchy is the same.

It's not a rule as such, more a guide as to which chords have the strongest 'pull' back to the root of the key, and serve as a rough guide as to how often you might use them.

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chord VI (Dm): D-F-A

chord VII (Em): E-G-B or (Eb): Eb-G-Bb

Er, correction, swap these two around actually:

chord VII is stronger than chord VI, as it leads up by a tone (or semitone) to the root note - ie it's one chord below.

Similarly chord II is pretty strong as it leads down by a tone (or semitone) to the root note - ie it's one chord above.

Chord II is also the fifth of chord V, which is the fifth of chord I, etc etc around the cycle of fifths.

Chord III is the weakest because it sits halfway between I and V and shares two notes common with them - thus making it vague as to whether it's actually I or V when it's not.

ramble ramble ramble...

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then its tone semitone tone tone tone semitone

right? been a few years since i did musicianship

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You could always try and go with just playing what you think sounds right, but not everyone might agree with you  ???

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You could always try and go with just playing what you think sounds right, but not everyone might agree with you  ???

Although the best thing about doing it this way is that people don't have to! If you follow no rules then you have nothing to defend.

And if people get antsy about not doing it properly you can just tell them they're narrow minded ;)

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then its tone semitone tone tone tone semitone

right? been a few years since i did musicianship

There's always the death metal scale:

semitone semitone semitone semitone semitone semitone semitone semitone semitone semitone semitone semitone

:bang: :eatadick:

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For the theorists....

What does 'sus' refer to in a chord?

Some examples:

Fsus2

B♭sus2

Csus

They're littered through the RENT soundtrack.

Anyone else familiar with RENT? You know, the one with the song, "AIDs... Everybody Has AIDs"? Team America, oh so funneh! :o

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