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AnthonyEhsani

Work experience

16 posts in this topic

hey there guys

As some of you know, I'm finishing up my HSC in a couple of days so i'll be able to finally dedicate myself to making music and learning everything. Everyone who is into sound/audio engineering talks about how it is important to have experience and how the employer is looking for someone with the know-do not the know-how... So I was just wondering how one, such as myself (with little experience), be able to approach someone in the field (at a studio) and ask for work (for experience).

And if anyone knows any studios in sydney and would be able to list them..it would be much appreciated..

This could turn out to be a good topic ;)

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well i suppose is depends what area you want to go into ...  And although i really wouldnt know a whole lot about gaining a job in studio work , or a recording field ,  id say one of the simplest things you could work on , is polish up your tunes a bit ..

Its not a resume but its going to probably help at some time .. When ever you do get around to sending in your resume's, you might include a few snips of your music, or audio work..  It shows a potential employer that your serious about music , and you have a genuine interest in it ... It also shows your probably already familiar with some audio terminology , and technology (albeit a very different world the home DAW is to a modern day recording studio) but none the less , its a start ..  And from personal experience in a completely different industry , employers tend to hire the people with a passion over those who are just in it for a job.

As part of my resume for my current engineering job , I used all my web sites as references , including soundpunk.  It showed that when I went home at night , I still had my head stuck into code and computers , its a passion of mine , and not just a job...      Believe it or not iv worked with people in the past who dont even own a computer .. they just got into IT for the money , but really hate the industry .. its those people that never really go anywhere.

Im sure some of the guys around here who actually in the industry should be able to give you some pointers ..    But ones things for sure ,  be prepared to take the shit kicker job , for minimum wage , and extended hours ..  It might not be pretty , but its a door way to where you eventually want to be ..

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Personally, i'd forget trying to get your foot in the studio door just yet - there's much to learn about sound before they let you touch a desk :P You'll also find such work experience positions, even unpaid, are few and far between.

I'd suggest the first foot in the door you could get would be work experience at a sound company for a while - live PA/delivery boy/rigger and the like. You'll probably start on no to low pay (if you're serious) and prove yourself and start getting paid. Yep, arse end of the industry - lugging, setting up foldback and hauling out and shite hours. But, you'll learn a lot about signal path and setting up PA systems, which will help you understand how to mix when you go on to apply it. Hell, you may even score some mixing gigs like Amz and earn some dosh in the near future while you study further! It's not studio, but a lot of guys in studio's have hauled arse live for years to get there... getting their foot in the door by mixing bands live who later ask them to mix down in the studio.

Worth a think, and certainly you'll get some really usable experience no matter which way you go in your career.

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hey guys thanks for the advice

@Jester.. I agree with you that it'd be hard with no pay (i was expecting that as ive heard it from everyone). The thing is I'm young and i have all the time in the world to work and get paid for it, but while i can i don't mind working for free and working hard... I'll enquire within some companies and we'll see what happens...much appreciated with all your comments... (except donnie :P:P:P)

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As stupid as Donnie's suggestion sounds... it's one of the few ways you'll get work experience in a studio. Prove the desire - beg them and try to show some commitment. If you're persistent, it may work. Much easier just to hit a PA company up, and you will end up getting paid while you learn. Always good incentive, and when you find you need to do some work while studying etc, it's nice to be doing something you're interested in :P

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well it bad enough getting into design, imagine its even harder getting into a studio...

begging and making things personal seems to work in my field..

plus persistance and an obvious love of your career path are also obvious plusses in an employers eyes

you dont think youd maybe LIKE to be in a studio.. you LOVE production.. you CANT WAIT to get into a studio and HELP OUT ALL THE TIME and LEARN AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE :P

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"Mega Vision Sound & Lighting are always interested in receiving applications from people with experience for the following roles:- Event Crew* Technicians, and Bump In / Bump Out Crew.  Part Time and Casual positions for Tradespersons are often available too. Excellent personal presentation and communication skills together with a preparedness to work on occasions after hours and on weekends is a requirement."

http://www.megavision.com.au/html/contact.php

Just a short plane flight away! :P

Stands to reason that there'd be plenty of similar opportunities in all the capital cities. Go for it!

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well it bad enough getting into design

Is it really that hard??? Every second person i seem to meet lately is either a graphic designer or about to start a design course of some description...

Though i guess i just answered my own question didn't I... :)

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Is it really that hard??? Every second person i seem to meet lately is either a graphic designer or about to start a design course of some description...

Though i guess i just answered my own question didn't I... :)

lol yup ..  it seems anyone with a copy of photoshop lately calls them selves a "designer" ..

So many people put them selves through a cheap tafe course with some basic skillsets and come out calling them selves a graphic designer..      Its the job for people who dont really know what they want to do ..

But of those millions of people there are a few handfuls of absolute gems ..   Some people just have a natural eye for it ..

Itd be a hard industry to break into , because every tom dick and harry seems to think they are a modern day electronic picaso .. 

It is pretty bloody hard to sift through all those people and find someone good though .. I must of gone through 20 or so looking for someone to do a new soundpunk logo ..  19 of them sucked , 1 of them was really good , but he was a wanker ..   

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Yeah, it is funny like that.

I have a friend thats an architect but an absolute freak with photoshop and illustrator, plus he has that abstract mind to go with it.

I have had difficulty in getting designers in the past to do flyer work as well. It's like some of them either think that its beneath them or they want a million dollars for it. Not understanding that we are not doing the party to make money, so budgets are slim to non existent anyway as i am sure you know all about.

I have often thought about putting up a little poster in the Design building at work asking for someone who wants to add some national exposure to their portfolio in exchange for a bit of probono work and a free night out.

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on my birthday this year (anzac day) i did a flyer for a mate.. got paid in free drinks all day/night :) score

best.birthday. evar.

plus there was lawn bowls, how good is that.. although next ones the 21st bday... could get.. worse..

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Thats the way i would like to do things, as i see that as being a greater sense of satisfaction being at the party enjoying yourself and knowing that you had something to do with it. I know it makes me feel all warm and fuzzy when stuff like that happens for me.

Plus the fact that most of our flyers/ posters get national and statewide exposure (print and web based media), so for a budding designer thats a nice little thing for the portfolio IMO

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Personally, i'd forget trying to get your foot in the studio door just yet - there's much to learn about sound before they let you touch a desk :) You'll also find such work experience positions, even unpaid, are few and far between.

I'd suggest the first foot in the door you could get would be work experience at a sound company for a while - live PA/delivery boy/rigger and the like.

Another 'foot in the side door' to studios so to speak, is to work where the studio owners go for gear - pro-audio music shops and repair workshops. The latter really only if you're an electronics nutter who wants to wield a soldering iron. Like Jester and others said re the AV companies, in retail and repair businesses, you're likely to start by unpacking deliveries and fetching coffees, then you move up to selling strings & leads at the accessories counter, and eventually you'll move up to the decent jobs that get you connected. Kind of an unofficial apprenticeship.

Why is it a foot in the door to studios? Because it's  chance to meet people and show them you know what you're talking about. They are coming to you for advice and help. Imagine selling a piece of software to a studio you like, along with an offer to come over after hours for a lesson to get them started. Who knows where it can end up.

I got a lot of freelance recording and mixing work through connections made in a music shop. I  know many others who have done the same. That being said, it did take a few years to develop the knowledge of product and rapport with the big clients, but hey, in the meantime I was still earning a full-time wage and hanging out with new toys all day.

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^ so at what point did you decide youd like to teach ?

I guess it really began through the shop as well, so over ten years ago now B)  I realised there was a lot of customers investing in very complicated technologies who had little idea of what they were doing. It began as private home-based tuition, then was invited to teach intro Pro Tools at a little private school (now defunct but was based at Revolver in Melb).

I began casual TAFE teaching at Vic Uni on the back of my private teaching, before one needed certification to teach. That got me the job at Swinburne. After a few years of this I realised I really liked it and pestered my bosses for a permanent job - about 2 years later I got my wish.

So Anthony, it might seem like miles off, but the jobs you get now will ultimately be stepping stones to new and different things years down the track. Don't think what you decide to do now is the only option you're stuck with later. If you can't get straight to the job you want, think about associated work that still connects you in some way to the music scene. You never know who you'll meet and where it will take you ;)

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