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Amz-Star

Ears

47 posts in this topic

ewww, does it make everything sound like fall out boy?

u poor bastard

LucfKdukf10

But I digress. :(

What on earth happens with an inverted ear drum? Just trying to picture it.

I had a perforated ear drum in high school where I could blow bubbles from my left ear if attempting to equalise pressure while under water. A blessing in disguise really as Marine Studies was already getting a bit cold to be swimming off Manly despite wetsuits. Thankfully, it was to later heal itself.

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^^ It's PICTIONARAOKE!!!!

Powerpoint magic...

btw regards the inverted eardrum, pretty straightforward I think, basically the natural inward curvature of the eardrum is pushed out by a pressure build-up in the eustachean tube connecting the middle ear to the nasal cavity. Can be brought on by something as simple as blowing your nose too hard when really blocked up. The only solution seems to be antibiotics to clear up the infection behind the ear drum and give the ear drum itself rest and eventually it goes back to normal on its own. Amz I think you doc has said similar?

In any case, really painful and makes one hyper-sensitive to loud sound  :-

I found this rather hard-core article on various infections, diseases and conditions found in the ears of infants. Some light reading for you...  :dead: :dead:

http://www.eyeandear.org.au/training/ENTLectures/Airway%20topics%20-otitis%20media%20&%20Eustachian%20obstruction.pdf

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^^ It's PICTIONARAOKE!!!!

Powerpoint magic...

btw regards the inverted eardrum, pretty straightforward I think, basically the natural inward curvature of the eardrum is pushed out by a pressure build-up in the eustachean tube connecting the middle ear to the nasal cavity. Can be brought on by something as simple as blowing your nose too hard when really blocked up. The only solution seems to be antibiotics to clear up the infection behind the ear drum and give the ear drum itself rest and eventually it goes back to normal on its own. Amz I think you doc has said similar?

In any case, really painful and makes one hyper-sensitive to loud sound  :-

I found this rather hard-core article on various infections, diseases and conditions found in the ears of infants. Some light reading for you...  :dead: :dead:

http://www.eyeandear.org.au/training/ENTLectures/Airway%20topics%20-otitis%20media%20&%20Eustachian%20obstruction.pdf

Yeah  RB, that is baically what the doctor said.  I am off the antibiotics though, and she didnt say anything about the blowing your nose thing. 

BElieve me, it does get VERY sensitive to loud noise, music included.  A very annoying thing when you are trying to finish off a degree in Sound. ;)

So, to my right ear I say :eatadick: and to my left ear I say  :clap:

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Yeah  RB, that is baically what the doctor said.  I am off the antibiotics though, and she didnt say anything about the blowing your nose thing. 

That was something I read saying that if you have an inverted ear drum don't blow your nose too hard or it will make it worse.

Well derr...

;D

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Yeah, I can agree with the statement at least.  Even sneezing is painful.  Plus it is easier to get headaches cause it is so loud.

But, I can not actually do much to fix it.  I got told to do this weird exercise where it is like blowing up a balloon to try and release the pressure.  It makes you feel light headed.  I don't like it, but I am doing it. :'(

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As stated above: The normal tympanic membrane is slightly convex, with air behind it. With otitis media, there is build up of infected fluid in the middle ear, causing the ear drum to bulge towards the viewer. With the infection there is associated inflammation of the ear drum and middle ear. When normal soundpunk waves vibrate the inflammed ear drum it hurts. ;) The fluid in the middle ear obviously prevents transmission of sound waves to the tiny bones in the ear that connect to the auditory nerve, causing temporary deafness.

Sometimes the inflammation of the ear drum causes erosion of the thinnest part of the ear drum, eventually leading to spontaneous perforation or a burst ear drum. Despite what one may think this actually provides some relief to the sufferer as it releases the pain and feeling of pressure in the ear. It actually assists the clearing of the infection and fluid in the middle ear. Obviously attempting to perforate it or draining it oneself is not a good idea. You should never put anything smaller than your elbow in your ear!

All should clear up with a good course of antibiotics. If its not slowly getting better or your concerned, go back and see your local doctor. :D

Of course all of the conditions listed in the article by RB are very rare in the general population, unfortunately these conditions are primarily suffered by young Aboriginal children.

also, if one eardrum was inverted, would you be hearing everything out of phase??? 

If one was inverted and the other not, shouldn't you hear nothing. ie phase cancellation?  :D

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tympanic membrane solo :cans:

I flew up to brissy a few years back and as we started descending into bris, this rising pain in my right ear started.  I tried yawning and some chewy to equalise the pressure but it just got worse and worse.  It was so painful for a few months even after taking antibiotics, and whenever I yawned I would get this kind of fizzy noise in my ear, it was so weird.

Glad it's better now.  It seems to be something that corrects itself as opposed to damaging cilia hairs which never recover.

Found this hearing loss simulator which has a good little animation of the sound path in your ear

http://www.audibel.com/understanding/simulator_flash.html

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^^ Awesome. I love the differences between the sexes. I was half expecting:

Female says: get out of the bloody studio, we never talk anymore

Male hears:  blah blah blah

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No worries, more than happy to provide explanations. (Obligatory Disclaimer: as long as everyone realises that its for information purposes only and doesn't constitute or replace actual medical advice. Diagnosis needs to be made with proper individual history and examination ;):D )

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Dr. Woot is in da house!

Let's start a clinic - Dr. Rhythm and Dr. Woot's tinnitus factory!

:cans:

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Dr. Woot is in da house!

Let's start a clinic - Dr. Rhythm and Dr. Woot's tinnitus factory!

:cans:

Yeah yeah, free monthly breast examinations for Soundpunk (female) members only... Jesters not included ;)

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I haven't read the entire thread coz its big .. but you'd be surprised how many ear issues (including tinnitus) can be cause be dental problems.

Has that been said here?

I have tinnitus and its all because I need some major dental work STAT..

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I haven't read the entire thread coz its big .. but you'd be surprised how many ear issues (including tinnitus) can be cause be dental problems.

Has that been said here?

I have tinnitus and its all because I need some major dental work STAT..

I went to a Mike Stavrou workshop once where he could tell which side of the mouth people had fillings in by standing in front of them and listening to them say 'aaahhh'.

His theory is dental work (or teeth in need of) alters the natural shape and internal resonances of the mouth. Also jaw and facial tension can pull the jaw up tighter into the face and at the joint pressure is put on the outer and middle ear.

Put your fingers on your jaw joint, in front of your ears and then open and close your mouth. Note how close the jaw joint is to the ear canal. If your muscles are out of whack up there then so is the natural shape of the head. Beyond that is a guess from me - anyone else want to pick this up? Woot?

Edit: just thougt must have something to do the dental nerves which run all the way long the jaw and into the skull too. Irritated nerves maybe adds to the tinnitus?

Eewww now I'm getting squeamish... thanks for reminding me of what I need doing too Nic Nac cheers  ;)

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So apparently there is 2 types of tinnitus.

The one commonly referred to as just "tinnitus" is really called subjective tinnitus.

Subjective tinnitus is "the false perception of noise in the absence of acoustic stimulus". The causes of this are extensive and exhaustive but include (not in particular order) noise induced hearing loss and other causes of hearing loss, neurological conditions such as head injury or tumours, infective processes, (non illicit) drug therapy and disorders of the temporomadibular joint (TMJ, the joint that RB eluded to that connects the jaw [mandible] to the skull) and also dental problems. So anyone who is exposed to frequent periods of excessive loud noise and jaw clenching (which leads to disorders of the TMJ) could potentially experience tinnitus.

Objective tinnitus is the perception of real sounds produced within the body. For example, conditions that cause turbulent blood flow eg valvular heart disease. Or spasm of small muscles within the mouth. 

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