Adamwah

"The everything you need to know but didnt have the balls to ask thread"

79 posts in this topic

You don't need to absorb sound unless there's some harmonic or reflection that's an issue. In fact, absorbing sound leads to the worst sounding studio's requiring more power and bigger monitors to have an impact. The world is an acoustically reflective place, balanced with absorption.

 

Ever walked into a great sounding hall? Notice how little soft finishings were in there and how well sound carried along with a natural reverb? How great a well played and placed acoustic instrument sounded without processing or effect? That's reflection - good reflection.

 

Ever walked into an anechoic chamber? Not sure about you, but i have and i wanted to leave very quickly. It's a very unnatural place and not entirely pleasant to be in there sound wise. Yep, great for referencing microphones and speakers... but not the sort of place you'd want to spend 7 weeks mixing a record or recording one. Not the sort of place i'd want to spend 7 minutes listening to a record... Then there's the obligatory beginner studio where it's been wall to wall with foam or other absorption, and sounds dreadful beyond even the natural/vacant room would.

 

The sound should not be 'dry'. A room - particularly a studio - should try to be acoustically balanced so that there are no emphasised tones. My own home treatment relies on a combination absorption and reflection. I don't want to loose energy and then have to try and replace it with volume - i just want to address any harmonics that provide pits or troughs in the sound. 

 

Any surface is an issue if it adversely impacts the frequency response. I haven't been to that studio, but i'm guess looking at the space, the main console and the list of clients they've had... it's a quite pleasant room to record and mix in without any acoustic issues created by 'glass'. Glass isn't the problem, the way it's used and a room is set up around it can be.

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I've seen other pictures with the "Big Room" , is made of wood and carpet, anti-reflection walls and some "things"  on ceiling  (sorry for my bad english), that 2 monitors are  not the only ones, they have like a big PA all over the room for cinema/movies i think. About the reflection, you said right, you need to have balance, seems like this studio has the perfect balance.

 I wasn't talking about an anechoic chamber when i said dry, we are on the same page here, but it was a misunderstanding.

P.S More pics and a video with the studio:

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post-23951-0-84736100-1407322619_thumb.jpg

post-23951-0-97393600-1407322626_thumb.jpg

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The walls and ceiling look like solid diffusers to me. They'll break down standing waves without stopping reflections or attenuating the sound via absorption. 

 

The room, other than the console, is a blank canvas from what i understand. Depending on the depth/size of your wallet and bank balance depends how it gets fitted out for you. But that's some pretty serious sound reinforcement going on in those pics. It's often said that the "big" speakers in the studio are there to impress clients (or those footing the bill!) where the guy doing the mixing really relies on those little things sitting on the top of the desk ;)

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Those main speaker boxes are extraordinary, with their whopping great quad-subwoofer bases!!!

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